Defining Differences in Caregiving

Acute/Immediate Caregiving

  • When someone is in the hospital, recovering from short term illness or surgery.

Intermittent Caregiving

When someone requires some care, or is expected to make a full recovery.

Long Term/Intense Caregiving

  •  When someone isn't expected to make a fully recovery. It could be several months or several years. This level of caregiving is all encompassing.

Post Caregiving

  • After your loved one no longer requires help, navigating the world again can be hard. 

Gifts for Caregiving

Caregiving Gifts

Taking care of someone is tough work. It can be a rollercoaster... 

  • Life After Caregiving

    Life After Caregiving

    The physical, emotional and mental drain caregiving take on you, isn’t always felt while your caregiving. You’re too exhausted from all the immediate caregiving responsibilities that have taken up every...

    Life After Caregiving

    The physical, emotional and mental drain caregiving take on you, isn’t always felt while your caregiving. You’re too exhausted from all the immediate caregiving responsibilities that have taken up every...

  • Intense or Long Term Caregiving

    Intense or Long Term Caregiving

    This type of caregiving can be even harder than other types. Your loved one care needs are complex, frequent and long term. I could say - Take care of yourself...

    Intense or Long Term Caregiving

    This type of caregiving can be even harder than other types. Your loved one care needs are complex, frequent and long term. I could say - Take care of yourself...

  • Intermittent Caregiving Tips and Resources

    Intermittent Caregiving Tips and Resources

    Intermittent caregiving is possibly the most silent type of caregiving. The occasional Dr visits, the occasional hospital stay. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t affect you or take a toll...

    Intermittent Caregiving Tips and Resources

    Intermittent caregiving is possibly the most silent type of caregiving. The occasional Dr visits, the occasional hospital stay. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t affect you or take a toll...

1 of 3
  • CaringBridge

    Family and friends want to be updated on surgery, progress, or how to help. Instead of texting, emailing and calling a long list of family and friends, create a free CaringBridge site.

    Tara has done it both ways texting/calling individuals and using CaringBridge. She highly recommends using CaringBridge to update everyone. It's saves a lot of time and reduces your stress level.

    Pro tip:  Ask someone else to help maintain the site, it's a huge help. Especially day of surgery or right when they come come home.

    Go to CaringBridge Website 
  • Caregiver Action Network

    Caregiver Action Network (CAN) is the nation’s leading family caregiver organization working to improve the quality of life for the more than 90 million Americans who care for loved ones with chronic conditions, disabilities, disease, or the frailties of old age. Resources to family caregivers across the country free of charge.

    Go to Caregiver Action Network website 
  • AARP

    AARP has some great resources for caregivers.  Including lots of helpful blog posts on their site.

    Go to AARP Caregiving website